Impact Employment

The list of IRIS metrics below represent those that align with the set of Impact Employment metrics developed as part of the Impact Sourcing Metrics Working Group

Impact Employment is a hiring and human resources model that intentionally employs vulnerable or disadvantaged individuals with the goal of creating a positive impact on the employees, their families, and eventually a broader community. This metric set is most useful for those organizations with employment models that extend beyond the core of their business operations and are interested in ensuring the integrity and positive results of these employment practices. Disadvantaged or vulnerable groups can be defined based on their economic status, certain health conditions, gender and many other factors.  Impact Sourcing refers to the sector-specific impact employment practices of business processing outsource centers.

In 2014, the GIIN and Rockefeller Foundation convened a Working Group, composed of Impact Sourcing Service Providers (ISSPs), large corporates, and others with experience hiring with good impact employment practices in place with the goal of developing a set of Impact Employment focused metrics. 

Experts reviewed different practices in performance measurement used by organizations targeting disadvantaged groups, pulling from sources such as the International Labor Organization and reporting frameworks such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 Guidelines and metrics standards like IRIS. 

Experts reviewed different practices in performance measurement used by organizations targeting disadvantaged groups, pulling from sources such as the International Labor Organization and reporting frameworks such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 Guidelines and metrics standards like IRIS.

Further, the working group vetted the metrics through an open comment period and pilot program soliciting feedback on the clarity, usability, and feasibility of the catalog of metrics. The metrics are focused on five different performance categories including hiring practices, employment practices, remuneration & benefits, training & development, and family & community development. When used together, the metrics selected can provide a full picture of the performance of an organization around Impact Employment activities.

The brochure, available for download on the Impact Sourcing Working Group page, provides further background and rational as well as suggestions for how to adopt the metrics.

It’s important to note that the first metric in the full Impact Sourcing metric set helps organizations define the vulnerable/disadvantaged group of focus.  Categories include persons with disabilities, the poor, populations in low income areas or areas with limited opportunity to find an equivalent job, women, HIV positive persons and AIDS victims, persons in recognized refugee status, cultural, ethnic, and religious minorities and indigenous populations.  This definition of ‘vulnerable/disadvantaged’ should be used throughout the reporting of performance metrics. 

As with all IRIS metrics, it is important to state that interpretation of these metrics must also take into account other aspects of a company's context, and changes over time. Stand alone numbers cannot by themselves indicate positive or negative social performance, or necessarily be compared across companies or products. 

The full set of metrics developed as part of the Impact Sourcing Working Group can be found hereThe metrics that align to metrics in IRIS 3.0 are listed below.  Additional metrics from this set will be incorporated as part of IRIS 4.0 scheduled to be released in Spring 2016.

 

 

Impact Employment Metrics